Will there still be a Labour Party on June 9?

Democracy is in as much trouble in Britain as it is in many other places that would style themselves as such, no matter the frequency with which its citizens are invited to the polling station. And they are being invited again, by a government that is intending to deploy a national poll as a weapon of mass electoral destruction. It has the appearance of a blatantly opportunistic move to decimate the Labour Party, but let’s not be too precious about that. Politics is a contact sport, and it makes sense to kick an opponent when they’re down, to make sure they don’t get back up again. Let’s just not swallow the fiction that there’s anything patriotic or necessary about this. For the Prime Minister, an election might remove some limitations to her freedom of action to operate domestically, but it will make negligible difference to her negotiations with the EU27 over the coming two years, as has already been pointed out.Read More »

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Enjoying the kakistocracy?

kakistocracy /kakɪˈstɒkrəsi/ – government by the least suitable or competent citizens of a state.

The professionals might decry such a claim, but sometimes armchair psychology is really easy. It’s a game probably most people play with national leaders, especially at a time like ours when so much political power around the planet is being held by people who shouldn’t be allowed to have any. To survey the global landscape of power in 2017 is to behold so many figures occupying a spectrum of egregiousness that ranges from the Machiavellian to the inadequate, from malfeasance to maladroitness, it feels not so much a time to think about creating a better tomorrow, more crossing fingers that there will be a tomorrow at all.Read More »