The five stages of Brexit

Watching David Cameron announce his resignation following Britain’s vote to leave the European Union last Thursday elicited a curious mixture of feelings.  The Prime Minister has always been good at looking the part when responding to momentous events, and this was a performance exquisitely calibrated to invite empathy flow in his direction from those watching. Then I remembered that he was the architect of his own Waterloo. However, unlike Napoleon’s last desperate roll of the dice, Cameron’s final stand was largely driven by the smaller matter of internal party management. As so often in his career, manoeuvres for short term tactical gain won out over the strategic longer game. Over such trivialities can hugely consequential ramifications ensue, and we can’t even begin to imagine what longer term impact this will have on Europe. As for Cameron’s gift for presentation, was he anything other than a PR man in the end? The sober analytical side of me told me that I should be contemptuous of Cameron and where he had led the country to, and yet my feelings were more complicated. Maybe this weakness made me the real compassionate conservative.Read More »

There are multiple possible Brexits, but only one is on offer

Sometimes I wonder if I receive tragic news with too much coolheaded equanimity, but I felt myself physically sagging when news of the murder of Jo Cox came through on Thursday. I cannot remember the last time I experienced that sensation. While we cannot yet truly know what was in the mind of the killer, and while full details of the killer’s motives will take time to emerge, it would be preposterous to strip away the context in which this savage killing took place. Truly it was a day of infamy. Many Leavers in the European Union referendum debate have been complaining about the “politicisation” of Cox’s murder. Some have even been reducing it to a mental illness issue, as happens in the United States following a gun rampage. But it is undeniable that this was a targeted murder, and that it carries immense political significance. An act of terror. And it has occurred against the backdrop of a hateful and divisive referendum campaign that has exacerbated underlying trends which coarsen and inject poison into a now vitriolic political arena.Read More »

The incomparable distinction of The Greatest

It has frequently been remarked that 2016 is a year of living dangerously for celebrities. One had expected that to be invoked again following the death of Muhammad Ali last weekend, but this writer hasn’t encountered any such talk. It’s as if Ali is in a category of his own, or hors catégorie, as the mightiest mountain passes in the Tour de France are nowadays defined. It’s perhaps apt to describe such a transcendent figure thus. Yesterday he was laid to rest in Louisville, and, given how much he suffered throughout his mental and physical decline after retirement – or perhaps it would be more apt to trace his degeneration to that brutal contest with Joe Frazier in Manila in 1975 – one is tempted to regard his passing as a mercy or release. But any questioning of the extent to which one should feel sorrow is mitigated by knowledge of the absence of regret from Ali himself throughout his struggle with Parkinson’s disease. Of course it’s a time to be sad for this 20th century titan.Read More »

The New Top Gear – less politically correct than you imagine?

Top Gear returned to our screens last Sunday, and like most, I was a bit disappointed by what was served up. There were moments, to be fair. It was amusing watching the section involving Jesse Eisenberg and Gordon Ramsay, which subverted notions about which of the US and the UK is the bombastic show off nation, and which is the more restrained and dignified one. Overall, what was most notable was how it cleaved so closely to the Clarkson/Hammond/May formula to the extent that it demanded comparison with its predecessor. One would have thought they would try to take it in a slightly different direction, but if any word best characterises the BBC these days, it’s fear. The producers and Chris Evans must have known that a pro-Clarkson mob would mobilise on social media to condemn their efforts, and castigate the new Top Gear (TNTG, for convenience) as a pale imitation. This series might yet evolve, as indeed can first impressions. Some commentators have bemoaned TNTG for being more politically correct than its earlier incarnation, but as I pondered that assertion I wondered was it actually true?Read More »

Jostling on the parliament floor

The glamorous Prime Minister of Canada, Justin Trudeau, recently lost some of his dreamy glow after a recent altercation in parliament during a contentious vote. This incident occurred during a vote on doctor-assisted suicide legislation on May 18, and this writer has been reflecting since on the ways in which politics mirrors other aspects of life. It is no longer remarkable to invoke Joan Didion’s famous observation that politics is a subset or even lesser branch of show business, certainly when America has allowed itself to sink into dumb fascination with the appalling Donald Trump during this election cycle, to the benefit of no one other than Mr Tangerine Man himself. There is, however, another area of contemporary show business that “Elbowgate” reminded me of, and that is soap opera side of football.Read More »